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America 89, U.s. 70, Us 45, Illinois 34, United States 30, China 30, Georgia 16, Colombia 15, Mr. Lipinski 14, Mr. Whitfield 11, South Korea 11, Maryland 11, Madam 11, Panama 10, California 10, Mr. Shimkus 10, Mr. Levin 10, Mr. Sarbanes 8, Pennsylvania 8, Michigan 7,
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  CSPAN    U.S. House of Representatives    News/Business.  

    July 28, 2010
    10:00 - 1:00pm EDT  

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university. i would also like to see president obama doing something about that. american small businesses are really having a tough time competing with some of these foreign companies. i was surprised. i called my credit card company one day and got someone in india. i have a bit of a hearing problem, i could not understand him. i used another one and wound up talking to another person in india. you see so much work in america being shipped overseas and it is a problem. something that congress and president obama need to look at. i agree. host: our topic, small businesses in the obama administration. our guests, lloyd chapman, thank you for being with us. guest: thank you for -- thank you very much. host: in a moment we will take you to the floor of the u.s. house of representatives.
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by the way, the senate judiciary committee is holding another hearing on the fbi. robert mullen will be among those testifying. the debt commission is holding its first public hearing -- fourth public hearing with alan simpson, coverage online at c- span.org. thank you for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the floor of the house, enjoy the rest of your day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., july 28, 2010. i hereby appoint the honorable ed pastor to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, nancy pelosi, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: this morning the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, pastor shawn black, calvary
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chapel, costa mesa, california. the chaplain: dear lord god of heaven, we thank you for your faithfulness, your hand in creating this great nation. we acknowledge that all wisdom, guidance and governance truly comes from you. lord, we acknowledge that you tear down and you alone build up. thank you for your hand in the affairs in the hearts that govern. for you steer the hearts of kings and of nations for to you alone belong mercy, forgiveness and grace. help us to restore what is neglected, submitting with solitude and remaining resolute with this reflection in our lives. may you forgive us of our trespassers and immoveable upon your dependent and truth and grace. may you today encourage,
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rebuild our lives, our nation with the steadfast dedication in accomplishing your will devoted to none other than in god we trust. united in will, submitted in spirit, we thank you and we praise your holy name and in jesus name we pray. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentlelady from maine, congresswoman pingree. ms. pingree: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has passed h.r. 4380,
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cited as the united states manufacturing enhancement act of 2010. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentlelady from maine rise? ms. pingree: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. ms. pingree: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, today i want to commend chairman waxman and rush for introducing h.r. 5820, the toxic chemicals safety act, a bill that will for the first time require the chemical industry to prove that the chemicals in our products are safe. in america, we have too long failed to regulate chemicals in consumer products, even those we know have links to cancer, reproductive disorders and health problems. under the old toxic substance control act, 62,000 chemicals were grandfathered in. only six chemicals have been banned since its passage.
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even asbestos could be taken off the market. passing new laws, phasing out mercury, lead and flamed retartant from everyday products. in 2008, our legislature passed the groundbreaking kids safe products act that identifies and phased out the most taxic chemicals that endangers our children. it's time that the nation follows maine's lead. it's never been important for the nation to pass the strongest and most toxic bill as possible. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, it's time to give hardworking americans incentives to invest in order to create jobs and grow the economy. we must also protect middle-class americans from significant tax hikes that are headed their way. contrary to liberal claims, these are not tax hikes only on
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the wealthy. the picture isn't pretty if these tax hikes go into effect. if you're a family of four and your income is $50,000 a year, you could pay $2,100 in additional taxes. if you're married and senior citizen earning $40,000 a year you could pay $1,400 in higher taxes. a single mom making $36,000 a year could end up paying $1,100 in new taxes. hardworking middle-class americans across the country cannot afford an attack on creating jobs. the federal government cannot pay off america's debt by higher taxes. in conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts rise? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the
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gentleman is recognized. mr. neal: this congress passed a bill for expiring tax relief. this has been stymied in the other body where only two republican senators have stood up against their party's filibuster for these tax cuts. the state sales tax deduction has provided parity for people living in states without an income tax. 600,000 families in tennessee cannot deduct $1.3 billion of state sales taxes. two million people in family cannot deduct $3 billion. 2.2 million families in texas cannot deduct $4 billion in state sales taxes. nationwide, more than 12 million families cannot deduct $19.5 billion in state sales taxes. this deduction will spur purchases for cars, boats and school supplies. but time is slipping away. we need to tell the other side
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to move these senators on the tax extenders bills because it means jobs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas? mr. poe: i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. poe: mr. speaker, venezuela dictator hugo chavez is threatening to cut off oil supplies to the united states. chavez doesn't like the fact that america is friendly with colombia. and since america is the bigger buyer of venezuelan oil, chavez thips he has a say in foreign policy. it makes no sense at all. and why are we paying dictators and tie rants to supply us with energy? -- tyrants to supply us with energy? we have energy here at home but we don't produce it. american-made energy provides good-paying jobs, the kinds of jobs that puts kids through college. but the offshore jobs is moving
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to indonesia, brazil and venezuela. it threatens america's jobs and the economy. it's a national security issue and it gives a brutal about a foon dictator like hugo chavez dangerous influence. end the ill-logical, ill-conceived offshore drilling moratorium. it's about time and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from california rise? mrs. capps: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. capps: i support the president on establishing a national ocean policy. now more than ever we needed a coordinated approach for the management of our ocean and coastal resources. the tragedy in the gulf is a wake-up call. we would have been much better prepared for this disaster if this bill was put in place. oil spills are just one threat. overfishing and ocean acidification is the urgent
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need to ensure wide stewardship of our oceans, lakes and great lakes. our states are linked to healthy coastal oceanic ecosystems. it will make our oceans healthier and our coastal communities stronger, will strengthen ocean governance, will bring a science-based approach to ocean conservation. mr. speaker, i applaud the president for taking this historic step. this vision will ensure that future generations can share in the wonders of our cherished seas. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from alabama rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to revisit the subject of health care reform, the bill was passed behind closed doors using brifery, deceit and arm twisting. it's not popular with the american people and the majority of them want it repealed. the promises made to the
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american people were false. you will not be able to keep your doctor. you will not be able to keep your insurance. there will be rationing of health care, even to the seen jors. the acute position shortage means the poor, the near poor, middle-class americans will find the quality of their health care diminished and their access limited. mr. griffith: emergency rooms will be busier than ever and it will be increasingly difficult for medicare and medicaid patients to be seen. the unfunded medical mandates forced onto the weakened systems of the states are designed to collapse and fail. the administration had no intention of keeping any of their promises that it made. their only concern was furthering their agenda, even at the expense of the taxpayer and the american health care system. the american people stand ready to support those of us who seek to repeal this disastrous health care bill. and i stand regslulet with my colleagues. -- resolute with my colleagues.
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thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from new york rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. maloney: this week we approved billions of dollars for wars in afghanistan. the president will not address this in the first place, the 9/11 terrorist attacks. on 9/11, thousands of americans were murdered and killed in the first act of the war on terror on our soil. but thousands more on that day lost their health when they ran into burning buildings to save the lives of others. nine long years after the attack we have yet to approve guaranteed help for the first responders that risk their lives for others. the house will soon vote on the 9/11 health and compensation act, a bill that provides health care and compensation to the thousands of americans that came from every -- almost every congressional district around this country to help others.
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the bill is fully paid for and meets our moral responsibility to help those who came to the aid of our nation in one of america's darkest hours. i urge my colleagues from across the country to support this patriotic bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. reichert: thank you. monday we recognize the 20th anniversary of the americans with disabilities act. it's important to recognize the work this country has done to ensure the equality of people with disabilities to make sure they experience a good quality of life, that their rights are protected and they have resources and tools to live fulfilled and productive lives. i am thankful for the leaders who fought for this law 20 years ago because it benefits people i love, family, co-workers.
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but, mr. speaker, this congress failed our community miserablely this year when it passed the health care overhaul and it did so at a steep cost. somehow this congress thought let's tax medical devices, tools with people with medical disabilities depend on every day. was this the right thing to do? i don't think so. some thought taxing pacemakers, hearing aids and wheelchairs was ok, it's acceptable. if that's an example of broken government i don't know what is. it's not ok. the not acceptable. taxing our disabled population is flat out wrong. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> this week when the house considers the 9/11 health and compensation act, my colleagues will have a choice, to vote to
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protect foreign corporations who are avoiding paying u.s. taxes or vote to protect those who stood in protection of us on 9/11. it's been almost nine years since our nation was attacked. 3,000 lives were lost, including that of my cousin. thousands more from injured, particularly those who spent days and months cleaning up ground zero. committed to never again that a terrorist attack occur on u.s. soil and we stood with the thousands who came to ground zero first to look for survivors and then to clean up. tomorrow, the house will get a chance to fulfill our thanks to those who served us. thousands were told by the federal government that the air is safe, return to work. a flimsy medical mask was told could keep them secure, keep cleaning up ground zero. but the air was not safe and now thousands are sick. we have a commitment to those who served us.
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we have a duty to pass the 9/11 health compensation act. vote yes tomorrow. make our nation proud. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . for what purpose does the gentleman from louisiana rise? without objection. mr. cao: vietnam announced the demolition of properties to make way for a tourist resort. no plans for adequate compensation or relocations were offered. at the same time the government told time for burials in a local church cemetery which for more than 100 years served as a town burial site and which the town recognized as a historical site. they prevented the burial at the cemetery and brutally beating the mourners. when 43-year-old refused to make false statements to authorities about the mourners, he was beaten by police and died in his home shortly thereafter. along with many others this incident shows that the government of vietnam has no
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respect for human rights. to make matters worse, they protected those who committed these outrageous acts. if our nation is to be recognized as a beacon of democracy and advocate of human rights, we must demand the same of those we work with, especially those of vietnam, whose human rights record is atrocious. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from nevada rise? >> to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: woil. the gentlelady is recognized. ms. titus: mr. speaker, i rise today to congratulate my constituent and member of the united states men's soccer world cup team, hercules gomez on his performance at the world cup. hercules gomez, a former soccer star at las vegas high school, was a standout forward for the united states at the world cup. with team u.s.a. facing a 2-nil
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deficit in a match with so leavea, the coach turned to gomez to come off the bench to provide a spark for the squad. thanks to gomez's energy and play making abilities, team u.s.a. rallied for a 2-2 tie. although we didn't prevail in the final competition, i want to congratulate hercules and his teammates for they are performance in the tournament. their team work and passion inspired millions of fans throughout the united states and was just a preview of what u.s.a. soccer can do in the future. i wish the best of luck to hercules gomez and welcome him home to district 3 where he is a local hero and role moddle to many aspiring young soccer -- roll model to many aspiring young soccer players. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, this weekend i had an opportunity in my community, sarasota, florida, to talk to a couple hundred people,
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working families and small businesses. they can't figure out, they have had to cut their expenses 20%, 30%, but yet congress is incapable of cutting its own expenses. first 206 years, history of our country, we accumulated $1 trillion. the last nine months we accumulated $1 trillion. last year was $1.5 trillion deficit. you would think after last year we would cut the expenses, but, no. this year another trillion and a half dollar deficit. next year they are projecting another $1.5 trillion deficit. we have to have a constitutional balanced budget amendment. it's a bill i introduced my first year here. it just says simply, you can't spend more than you take in. we need a constitutional balanced budget amendment now. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from massachusetts rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. miss tsongas: i join my
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colleagues today in recognizing the 75th anniversary of social security. social security has provided basic economic security for generations of americans. a woman from tookbury, massachusetts a. city i represent, recently wrote me to say, i am retired and dependent on social security to survive. please protect the benefits i have worked so hard for many years. over the years democrats have fought to improve and strengthen social security. as a result, the social security trust fund has reserved a $2.5 trillion which will continue to earn interest and pay benefits until 2037. but imagine if social security had benefits had been invested in the stock market during the recent wall street crisis? seniors would have lost billions of dollars in social security income, along with any retirement savings they had when the economy collapsed. despite what my colleagues on the other side of the aisle would argue, subjecting social
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security to the whims of wall street is not the answer. we must be committed to strengthening social security so that our contract with american workers endures. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. johnson: thank you, mr. speaker. america, hold on to your wallets. nancy pelosi and the democrats are coming after you with higher taxes. in the middle of a recession. come january, tax rates are going to skyrocket on hardworking middle class families and small business. a new poll says 55% of voters in battleground states would be less likely to vote for democrat congressional candidates if congress doesn't stop or delay next year's scheduled tax increases before election day. most small business owners file person income taxes and will feel a tax hike which will make
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it more difficult for them when they try to hire more people or give their employees a raise. this is about stopping a job-killing tax hibling on small businesses -- hike on small businesses during tough economic times. let's stop it for our future and our freedom. the speaker pro tempore: members are reminded that remarks in debate are to be addressed to the chair. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, democrats are committed to building an economy where anyone can make it in america. the oil spill compels us to do this by encouraging growth in green energy. we can do this by creating new manufacturing jobs. improving access to credit for small businesses, and investing in our infrastructure, our schools, and communities. we can encourage job creation here at home by closing tax
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loopholes for companies that ship jobs overseas and ending give aways to special interests. despite republican obstruction, our efforts on behalf of the american people, democrats have delivered six consecutive months of private sector job growth to the american people. mr. deutsch: we are moving in the right direction and in america we refuse to go backward. until every american out of work can find a good-paying job, we in congress must make it our job to pass legislation that will spur economic growth and create good opportunities for all americans. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, president obama and the democratic congress have set six records. unfortunately they are not the ones the american people hope for. one, americans are staying
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unemployed longer than ever before. two, for the first time since the current budget rules were adopted 35 years ago, the house will not pass a budget. three, the federal debt has never been larger. four, the cost of health care has never been higher. five, we are more dependent on foreign oil than ever before. and six, the federal government has taken control of an unprecedented number of private companies, according to the congressional research service. these records stifle economic growth and hurt all americans. they are taking our country in the wrong direction. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from ohio rise? without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. ms. kaptur: where the jobs on america has gone? read the labels. you'll know the answer.
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they have been shipped out by the millions and millions of the multinational offshore to places where people who labor in sweatshops can't afford to buy what they make. america will create jobs here again when we start making products here again. we have been amassing a trillion dollars of trade deficit year after year. that means more imports coming in here than our exports going out. read labels carefully. may tag washing machines used to be made in iowa. they are made in monterey, mexico. you know what? the people down there can't afford to buy what they make. then those machines are shipped back here, did you notice the price didn't go down? hundreds and hundreds and hundreds and thousands and millions of our jobs outsourced to places that some of our students can't even spell the names of. did you know 10% of the exports out of china go to one company? wal-mart. you guessed it. clothing, tools, gloves, even frozen fish. when you start wondering where all the jobs have gone, just
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read the labels on what you buy. you'll find the right answers. time to make good in america again. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from louisiana rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. fleming: mr. speaker, last week in my home state of louisiana, nearly 15,000 citizens gathered to rally against the obama administration's destructive moratorium on offshore drilling. the rally for economic freedom was meant to send a message to washington that this moratorium is causing serious damage to the gulf coast's economy. while speaking to the thousands of concerned gulf coast citizens, governor bobby jindal put forth another plea to the obama administration, pointing out that the moratorium is causing just as much damage as the spill itself. and here's a quote, governor
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jindal said, we shouldn't have to fight our own federal government just as we are fighting one disaster, we are fighting another disaster caused by washington. mr. speaker, let me be clear. this bill is tragic and it was caused by b.p. those responsible must be held accountable and we need to find the root cause of the spill. however, history will show that president obama did even more damage to the economy than b.p. through his destructive drilling moratorium. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from california rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. ms. chu: in the 1930's, over half our seniors lived in poverty. they survived on whatever friends and relatives could spare. so congress created a shield against common threats like old age and disability. and for 75 years social security has protected millions of
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americans. for 75 years it's been our government's bedrock promise. for 75 years it's helped people like janet moore whose husband passed away 13 years ago, leaving janice and their three children to fend for themselves. republicans wanted to hand this over to wall street. it's the same privatization team they tried five years back. if they succeeded, we would have lost trillions in the stock market. but democrats and the american people said no. today we again reject this and say yes to social security's promise, protecting americans' lives for another 75 years and many generations to come. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yield back her time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from arizona rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i'm appalled the united states senate eliminated over 700 million dollars
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protecting our u.s.-mexico border. ms. giffords: this appropriations bill in the senate included money to deploy the national guard to arizona and increase the number of border patrol agents and surveillance systems on the border. by refusing to approve these funds, the united states senate said no to supporting the troops who will be arriving on the border next week. the senate said no to increasing border patrol agents who would stop the flow of illegal drugs, illegal immigrants into our country, and the senate said no to protecting ranchers and border residents in my district. since thursday i have been fighting to reinstate the funding taken out by the senate and i'm pleased the house will consider an emergency supplemental border security measure today. i'm proud to be an original sponsor of that bill and i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to pass it without delay. the failure by our senate to provide the border security resources that arizonans and all americans deserve represents washington at its worst. it's also a sober reminder to all of us that the fight to strengthen border security is not over.
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thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from missouri rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support the democrats make it in america initiative. mr. carnahan: in my home state of missouri, we make things. manufacturing as always been a source of enormous pride and good-paying jobs. for missourians particularly where i represent, it's no secret that american manufacturing has had hard times. with make it in america we are reinvigorating that spirit of making things of american entrepreneurship. we are working to promote american jobs and put an end to policies to ship our jobs overseas. that's why we need to close tax loopholes that allow for outsourcing of u.s. jobs. we can use that savings to fund hometown tax credits to help small businesses expand, american manufacturing.
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we are already strengthening the rules ensuring the u.s. and its contractors buy american and building our transportation, energy, and communications infrastructure. we must keep going and fulfill to make it in america agenda to ensure new prosperity by promoting the competitiveness and innovation of the american people. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? >> to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, there's one question. the question is, where are the jobs? we have 9.7% unemployment, 15 million people out of work. since the democrats have been -- actually, since presumption has been elected, we -- since president obama has been elected, we spent $18 trillion in these 18 months. why are there no jobs? because there is uncertainty displayed by this administration and this
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congress. there is uncertainty on energy costs, there's uncertainty about health care costs, there's uncertainty about taxes. a businessman just told me yesterday you can't raise our taxes and expect us to hire more people and create new jobs. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered, or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. record votes on postponed questions will be taken later.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and
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agree to h.r. 49 -- 4692, the national manufacturing strategy act of 2010, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 331, h.r. 4692, a bill to require the president to prepare a quadrennial national manufacturing strategy, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from illinois, mr. rush, and the gentleman from georgia, mr. gingrey, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 4692, the national manufacturing
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strategy act of 2010, introduced by my dear friend from illinois, congressman dan lipinski. i commend him for his leadership on this important issue. mr. speaker, it's time for the u.s. to revise our u.s. manufacturing policy. this bill under consideration has gained strong bipartisan support by members of congress. our nation seeks to assert this once again on the global stage. america's manufacturing sector is an essential foundation of our nation's economy. consider that in 2009 the manufacturing sector employed more than 11.5 million people.
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ladies and gentlemen, that number, though significant, was not as good as it could be when you considered 10 years ago america's manufacturing sector employed 17.3 million people, meaning that our nation actually lost 5.8 million manufacturing jobs between the years 1999 and 2009. the national manufacturing strategy act of 2010 will make a significant difference in helping to restore and reposition our nation's manufacturing capacity so that the american worker can compete in today's global economy. today, we're still fighting our way through a global financial crises and we are facing aggressive competition from
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industrialized nations as well as emerging countries. some of our manufacturing competitors have designed and implemented five our 10-year strategic plan to allow their economy to not only compete globally but also to exploit us here in the u.s. the sad fact of the matter is the international market is not reciprocating, mr. speaker, by importing our goods to their markets. in recent years the u.s. has actually lost market share to roaring export countries like china, areas like southeast asia and countries like india. if we do not act now this
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steady decline will hurt us. we simply cannot allow that to happen. this bill requires the president to undertake a deep and broad analysis of the nation's manufacturing sector, including the international economic environment, technological development, work force elements, the impact of global policies and other relevant issues affecting domestic manufacturers. i also added a provision requiring analysis on the trade imbalance, job creation, employment disparities and work force development. based on this analysis, mr. speaker, the president, in
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collaboration with key cabinet officials within his administration, as well as governments, states and local officials and other key stakeholders in the public and private sector, will develop a four-year national strategy that adentifies recommendations to improve our nation's economic growth -- that identifies recommendations to improve our nation's economic growth. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support this bill and to help our manufacturing sector become vigor, become bolder and become better than it was in the distant past. mr. speaker, with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from georgia. gink -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from kentucky will control the time, mr. whitfield. mr. whitfield: first of all, i want to thank congressman lipinski of illinois for introducing this legislation on the national manufacturing strategy act. i think we all recognize an america today that our manufacturing sector, while still one of the strongest in the world, that we've lost a lot of manufacturing jobs. in fact, we've lost way too many. and this legislation, while it does provide additional studies to look at the problems for our manufacturing sector, i firmly believe that it does not go far enough and does not address the real problems with manufacturing in america today.
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one issue that we certainly need to look at in my view is the american tax policy. it's my upsing that the united states has the second highest corporate tax rate in the developed world and will soon move not number one slot because japan evidently is getting ready to drop its corporate income tax rate. we also know that already in the federal government there are many task forces that are looking at this manufacturing issue. for example, there is an interagency working group on manufacturing competitiveness. the commerce department has a manufacturing council. the manufacturing extension partnership program is in existence, and the interagency working group on manufacturing
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research and development is operating today. additionally, both the department of commerce under the bush administration and the white house under president obama issued reports and recommendations on the state of domestic manufacturing. and then just recently in june of this year, the national manufacturers association issued an extensive report on what was needed in america to make manufacturing in america more competitive. and one of the things that i pointed out was tax policy, a more aggressive trade policy to have tariffs lowered in other countries. and then the ability to compete in the global marketplace is vitally important. and one of the reasons i have been very much concerned about some of the energy policies of this administration, particularly as it relates to cap and trade, is that if that
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kind of legislation is adopted it's going to increase electricity costs and make manufacturing in america less competitive in the global marketplace. the c.e.o. of c.f.x. railroads was in my office two weeks ago and he said that the railroads are moving more coal to the ports for export to china today than they have ever did in the past. and he said the same thing is happening in australia. and the reason that is because the chinese is depending more and more on coal to produce electricity, and a delegation of them who came to washington said one of the reasons they were doing it was because they want the lowest electricity cost, to be more competitive in the marketplace and to encourage more manufacturing plants to move to china. so i think we need to make concrete action. we know the problems.
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and i will say this legislation will provide an additional study, and that may be important, and i would like to commend chairman rush and mr. lipinski because i think they improved this bill a great deal when they eliminated the task force and created one strategy board so that there was less repetitiveness on the study that this legislation calls for. so, mr. speaker, with that i would reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i yield five minutes to the author of the legislation, my friend from illinois, an outstanding member of this house, mr. lipinski, i yield him five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for five minutes.
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mr. lipinski: mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of h.r. 4692, the national manufacturing strategy act. over the past decade almost 1/3 of american manufacturing jobs have disappeared. after 110 years as the world's top manufacturing country, the united states is about to lose that perch to china. and we all know how hard it is when we go anywhere to buy toys, tools, whatever it is, we know how hard it is to find made in the u.s.a. on the label. but american manufacturing job loss is not inevitable and i do not accept the notion that there is nothing we can do. .
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another decade like the last one would dramatically undermine the american middle class and our national security. that's why i introduced the national manufacturing strategy act. i work with business, labor, and trade organizations to make this a bipartisan bill with broad support. at this time i want to ask unanimous consent to enter into the record letters of support from some of these organizations. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. will pin i ask: -- mr. lipinski: the strategy act requires the president to compose a board of private personnel to conduct in-depth analysis of american manufacturing. then they must produce a strategy that includes short-term and long-term goals for creating jobs, improving domestic production investment and international
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competitiveness, and assuring and adequate defense industrial base. finally, the president and the board must deliver specific recommendations for accomplishing these goals. like america's quadrennial defense review, the manufacturing strategy will be updated every four years. enabling us to build upon successful initiatives while correcting course if necessary. the government accountability office will have to produce an analysis of progress on implementation of this strategy. all this designed to make sure that the board is producing something and we are following through on that. mr. speaker, passage of national manufacturing strategy act will ensure the american manufacturing remains on the national agenda.
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other countries already have manufacturing strategies, including not only china and india, but the united kingdom, canada, brazil, japan, germany. it's about time that america does the same before it is too late for middle class americans and for our national security. some may say that the time for american manufacturing has passed. i don't believe it. i know that american manufacturers can compete with anyone in the world if we have a level playing field and if we are planning ahead. i know in my district from tool and dye, to tori steel, a few manufacturers making it, having a difficult time, but they can do it and all american manufacturers can do it because
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america has the greatest manufacturers in the world. i'd like to thank majority leader hoyer, caucus chairman larson for bringing this bill to the floor. i'd like to thank congressman braley for his work on this along with chairman bobby rush, ranking member whitfield for the work that we did in improving this bill. thank you for your comments. i wanted to make sure that we made this a strong bipartisan bill. that we could agree upon. there are a lot of issues that are out there and i believe we must continue to promote policies to help create jobs immediately. we are not going to agree on all those, but i think this is something that we can agree upon. the national manufacturing strategy act has a process for strengthening american manufacturing over the long term. it's something we must do and i
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ask my colleagues today to support this important legislation. pass this bill. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield five minutes to the distinguished gentleman from georgia, mr. gingrey, who is a member of the energy and commerce committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. gingrey: mr. speaker, i thank the gentleman from kentucky for yielding. i thank my colleague from illinois, mr. lipinski, for bringing forward this bill, h.r. 4692, the national manufacturing strategy act of 2010, as it's formally called. and i also of course thank the subcommittee chair, mr. rush, as well. i think they should be commended. it's a nice thing to do. it's a nice statement to make. this national manufacturing strategy act.
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and as mr. lipinski just said, mr. speaker, it would assure, hopefully, that manufacturing remains on our national agenda. and that's about all it can do. in my humble opinion, mr. speaker, that's just about all it can do if it's 100% successful. it will assure that manufacturing remains on our national agenda. when we are sitting here in this country with 10%, nearly 10% unemployment and 16 million people out of work, many of them for more than six months, indeed that's the reason we wanted to extend unemployment coverage for 99 weeks, it's time, i think, that we need to act and act very positively, very aggressively. and you just heard, mr. speaker, from the ranking member of the committee, mr. whitfield, talk
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about these trade agreements that have been negotiated. in fact, two, three years ago with south korea w. colombia, with panama. and yet the democratic leadership of this house refuses to bring those trade agreements to the floor for an up or down vote. it's just amazing to me that we are spending time on a bill that's going to study the issue more and come forward with a report when we have information that says the free trade agreement with south korea and colombia alone would lead to a decline of $40.2 billion in united states -- the failure to implement, i should say, the failure to implement those trade agreements will lead to a decline of $40.2 billion in u.s. exports of goods and services. failure to act would also leave
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$44.8 billion in missed opportunities for u.s. companies while also resulting in roughly another 400,000 jobs going elsewhere. that is offshore. again there's no finer gentleman in this house than representative lipinski. i have great respect for him. and i know -- i think he's trying to do the right thing, because it's the only thing that his majority will let him do, mr. speaker. what we need to do is approve these free trade agreements. we need to lower the corporate tax rate. oced countries have done that except us. and we are sitting here with a 35% corporate tax rate. we are doing nothing. really we are doing nothing but creating another study group. that's about as duplicative as you can get. god knows how many study groups, mr. speaker, we have already created. i, too, like mr. lipinski, meet
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with my manufacturers in the 11th district of georgia, and i just did that last week. and we talked about these things. these free trade agreements that have been negotiated. how much it would improve our exports. and our positive trade balance and create manufacturing jobs and do it now. we talk about the tax structure. we talk about overregulation and the burdens that this government are placing on our manufacturers. and then we are -- just like we stand up and honor the troops once a week, i guess at least once a month we stand up and honor the manufacturing industry and in the russ belt, all the while suffering 16 million unemployed and 10% unemployment rate. we are not doing anything except studying it to death, as the ship continues to sink. i say the bill, i'm going to support it, sure, but this is the wrong approach. and i don't mean any disrespect
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to my colleague. it's a good bipartisan effort. i'm glad that we finally take an opportunity to do something in a bipartisan way, but we need to move much quicker, much faster, much further, mr. speaker. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: at this time, i would yield four minutes to the gentleman from illinois, mr. manzullo. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for four minutes. mr. manzullo: mr. speaker, today we have a unique opportunity to lend a hand to american manufacturers. i'm proud to join my good friend and colleague from illinois, mr. will pin i ask, -- mr. lipinski, being an original co-sponsor of this legislation, and when i chaired the small business committee we had field hearings in both his district and mr. davis' centered on the issue of manufacturing in america.
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it's the co-founder and co-chair of the house manufacturing caucus, i can't overstate the importance of manufacturing to america. one in six jobs in america is directly related to manufacturing and one in four in the congressional district that i represent. manufacturing drives innovation by conducting nearly half of all research and development and creating the bulk of technology in our nation. nearly 60% of exported goods are manufactured goods. every $1 in final sales in manufactured goods, supports $1.40 which is higher than any other economic sector. if we don't make things in america that even those service jobs, however, would disappear. i spent probably 2/3 of my time in congress studying and working on manufacturing issues from raw materials and minerals all the way through to export controls. in fact, within the past
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congress working with congressman blumenauer, crowley, and sherman, all democrats, we were able to amend section 17-c of the export administration act which has resulted in the additional billions of dollars of more aircraft parts being exported. i'm probably the only member of congress who has ever gone to wear housing school to study -- warehousing school to study the flow of manufactured items on the floor to sales. every few years the manufacturing sector in the u.s. experiences a crisis. the last report that was issued was in 2004. this chart right here represents probably 12 or 14 years of work in my office. we try to identify the numerous federal programs and agencies that support manufacturing. people will come to the office. we would add in hand exactly what those are. it's still difficult to have a central focus point to know who is manufacturing and who is
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doing research in a particular area. for example, if somebody wants to do research, a machining titanium, there is no central portal through which that person can go to determine exactly what programs or who is doing that research. that's one of the beauties of the bill that congressman lipinski has introduced. why is it necessary to have a study? because americans need to know the importance of manufacturing. if we don't have manufacturing, agriculture urel -- agriculture in this country we become a third world nation. if we can't make things with our hands, then we became hindered. and maintain our status as a world leader. the whole purpose of having a comprehensive strategy in manufacturing is, as mr. lipinski said, the importance to the fact that young people need
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to go into manufacturing, need to go to our community colleges to learn how these sophisticated machines are made. i've probably been in 500 to 700 factories all over the world. studied and analyzed exactly what america needs. this bill has as its purpose to show americans, but more importantly to bring to the attention of fellow members of congress, the absolute importance of protecting manufacturing in this country. it is a great bill because it will help identify those programs that exist, those that are working, and those that should be eliminated. i urge my colleagues to support it. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: mr. speaker, it is my privilege and honor to allocate as much time as he may consume
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-- one minute. one minute to our great majority leader, congressman hoyer of maryland. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i'm pleased to follow my friend, congressman manzullo, in speaking about the importance of making it in america. . it's not about manufacturing in america, it's about succeeding in america. to make sure that america is the vibrant engine of our economy and the international economy. making things not only for americans but for all the world. and i thank mr. manzullo for his comments. americans have always looked to the manufacturing sector as a source of economic vitality and
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as a source of pride. and i want to thank mr. rush, who has been an outstanding leader in this congress on behalf of growing our economy, jobs for americans, good paying, good benefits for all americans. america has long prided itself in a country that makes things, and democrats and i know my republicans -- republican friends are committed to making sure that is true in the future. america agrees on the importance of manufacturing to our economy. you just ask them and they will tell you we need to make it in america. 57% of americans believe that it is one of the most important factors in our economic strength and 85% of americans believe that creating manufacturing jobs is important to our economic recovery. we need to make it in america.
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it's true that manufacturing has taken a severe hit in this recession. in fact, it's been taking hits for quite sometime. particularly under the previous administration over the -- previous administration. over the past decade, america lost 1/3 of its manufacturing jobs. these three bills are designed to turn that status around. if we want american manufacturing to be strong again, if we want to emerge from these hard times with a more competitive, job-creating economy, we need to get serious about our manufacturing strategy. that is the impulse behind the democrats making it in america agenda. -- democrats' making it in america agenda. investments in industry, strengthen manufacturing infrastructure and strengthening our work force and helping to level the playing field for american companies, that's what our focus is going to be.
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that's what mr. manzullo was talking about. so far the make it in america agenda has resulted in the passage of the u.s. manufacturing enhancement act that passed the house just a few days ago on an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote, passed the senate by unanimous consent and is at the white house. this helps american companies get the affordable materials they need and it's passed the senate and is on its way to become law. the congress passed the sectors act to make sure that our people have the skills to make it in america. bills like these build on the success we've already had in rallying america's manufacturing sector under the obama administration. since the beginning of the year, our private sector has created 136,000 new manufacturing jobs.
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this bill, the national manufacturing strategy act, can contribute to that job creation. it directs the president to develop a national manufacturing strategy every four years with the input from the private sector, from manufacturing leaders, federal officials and state governments. this will analyze all of the factors affecting american manufacturing, from financing to trade barriers and recommend actions the industry, state and local governments can boost manufacturing and create good-paying jobs. i spoke about this the other day at the center for america progress and representatives of the national association of manufacturers, mr. chairman, stood and congratulated us on this effort. and i told her that we were looking to work -- work with the national association of manufacturers and others to build manufacturing capacity and to create these good-paying jobs with good benefits and making america work better.
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the bill's sponsor, congressman lipinski, from the heartland of america, your state, mr. rush, illinois, points out that the similar national strategy are widespread. china, india and the u.k., brazil, germany all have manufacturing strategies, and we need one if we want to stay competitive with them. and and has been true in the past, the -- and has been true in the past, the made in america label will be sought and demeyered throughout the world. -- demired throughout the world. this bill will take our industry's struggles seriously and begin responding to them constructively. i urge my colleagues to pass this bill and the two that will follow to make america a more competitive, growing economy. make it in america, an agenda
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that the house will consider this week and the four weeks when we return from our break. the clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance act, which will ensure that clean energy technology firms have the information and assistance they need to stay competitive, and the end the trade deficit act, all on the agenda sponsored by congresswoman matsui, which will develop strategies to combat the trade deficit. through steps like these we can begin to restore america's pride in its manufacturing and in the solid jobs it creates for middle-class families. make it in america is not simply a slogan. it is a commitment, a commitment to re-establish a dynamic engine for job creation. make it in america is a commitment to ensuring that america's future is one in which america competes
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successfully and profitably in the new global marketplace. make it in america is a psychology of excellence and level playing field in trade relations and the creation of an environment that facilitates manufacturing project, expansion and the sale of american products throughout the world. the work ethic of our workers have historically led our country to extraordinary economic growth and success. the make it in america agenda is a commitment, a commitment to making that success not only a proud part of our history but a reality for our future. we're going to make it in america and we're going to make it in america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back his time. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: may i ask how much time we have remaining on this side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky has seven minutes.
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mr. whitfield: ok. at this time i'd like to yield three minutes to mr. shimkus of illinois. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for three minutes. mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. i come in support of h.r. 4692, the national manufacturing strategy act. i was pleased to support -- actually, my two great colleagues from illinois, mr. lipinski and mr. rush, i appreciate them bringing it down to the floor. basically i think what can occur from this is a re-evaluation of things that we know. when we're at 9.5% unemployment, 15 million americans unemployed, 1.5% increase since the failed stimulus bill was passed at a cost of $1.2 trillion, what the businesses need to create jobs -- what do businesses need to create jobs and what does the manufacturing sector need to create jobs?
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they need certainty. as i said in my one-minute this morning, a businessman said you can't ask you to -- us to create more jobs when you raise our taxes. you can't create more jobs when you raise our taxes. that's issue one. that will come out of the national manufacturing strategy. you can't expect us to create jobs when you raise our energy costs. the cap and trade energy bill passed through this house raises energy costs. it is a tax on carbon. carbon is a fossil fuel. that raises manufacturing costs. we cannot create more jobs when we add costs to the manufacturing sector. we cannot create jobs when there's regulatory uncertainty. when we've got e.p.a. and osha and all these people poking around trying to protect the workers, which they do, it's
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that old saying, i'm from the government and i'm here to help you. well, they're not here to help you under this administration. they're here to penalize. they're here to fine. they're here to create uncertainty which makes it very difficult to create jobs. in theand -- and the last one is the health care law. additional uncertainty. we have to pass the bill before we know what's in the bill. what do you think the manufacturing companies are doing? they're trying to figure out what we just did to them. so i hope this national manufacturing strategy, which i am a co-sponsor of, will say reduce the tax burdens, ease the regulatory burdens, lower energy costs, make a competitive, vy rant market, that's how we create jobs in america. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair lays before the house an enrolled bill. the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: mr. speaker, may i
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ask how much time i have? the clerk: an act to provide for an additional temporary extension of programs under the small business act and the small business investment act of 1968 and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois has nine minutes. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the author of the legislation, mr. lipinski, once again. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. lipinski: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, mr. hoyer was down here. i want to thank him again for really putting forward this make it in america, sell it to the world. you ask any american, they know that's what we need to do to keep this recovery going and really get us out of this recession. i also want to thank mr. manzullo for all the work he's done. we worked closely together
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since i've been in congress in manufacturing, and i think the chart he had up here was one of the best reasons we need a strategy. the government is doing a lot on manufacturing. it's oftentime ad hoc. i thank mr. manzullo for his work on that. i think that's a great example. and those who say, well, maybe the government shouldn't be doing anything on manufacturing, we are already doing a lot. let's get it together and let's do it right. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, i have four minutes left, is that correct? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 4 1/2. mr. whitfield: and on the other signified the speaker pro tempore: eight minutes. mr. whitfield: well, i'd make some concluding remarks. all of us on this side of the aisle supports mr. lipinski's effort. we believe this legislation is good and we commend mr. rush and mr. lipinski. but we reiterate that this administration is not doing
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enough to improve manufacturing in america. the majority leader said we want more product produced in america. but in order to do that we need a tax policy that encourages investment, not make it more expensive to do business in america. we need a policy to provide incentives for more research and development to be more competitive in the global marketplace. we need a strong program to defend and protect intellectual property developed by our manufacturers. we need a strong international trade policy that encourages more american products to be sold abroad, and as the gentleman from illinois said, we need an energy policy that does not raise energy cost. and every objective analysis of the obama administration's cap
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and trade system would say that bill would dramatically raise energy costs up making american manufacturers less competitive, not more competitive. and i already talked about china and how the steps that they're taking to decrease their electricity costs, so we support this -- we support this bill, but we need to do more and we call upon the administration to do more than just talk about these issues. and with that i'd yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back his time. the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. rush: mr. speaker, what we don't need is more excuses. what america doesn't need is more excuses that have been heard on this floor for many years now. we don't need any more excuses,
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mr. speaker. we need action, and this bill that we're deliberating on today, this is a bill that will make america -- it will make america a much more viable and make the american manufacturing sector more robust. i want to remind members of this house that the american manufacturing has been the engine that drives the economy for more than 100 years and will continue to well into the 21st century. americans' future, security, and leadership in the global economy will depend on the strength and viability of our manufacturing base. that's why it's so important to reverse the current way.
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we lost more than five million american manufacturing jobs in 2000. almost 17% of manufacturing jobs in the nation. we can maintain our leadership in this economy, but only, only if we strengthen our economy which is manufacturing. americans' economy depends on manufacturing. manufacturing, about $1.4 trillion or 12% of our gross domestic product. manufacturing is responsible for nearly 2/3 of private sector research and development in the u.s. over the past two decades, manufacturing productivity has increased at twice the rate of the rest of the private sector. america's economy depends on
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manufacturing. america's economy depends on manufacturing for good jobs, manufacturing directly employs 14 million americans and support eight million more. each manufacturing jobs support as many as four other jobs. providing a robust economy. for example, 100 jobs create between 400 and 500 new jobs in the rest of the economy. for every one. this contrasts with the retail sector where every 100 jobs generates nine new jobs elsewhere. and in contrast with the personal service sector where every 100 jobs create 147 new
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jobs. this multiplier effect -- reflects how manufacturing rivers run deep in the overall economy and means improvement in manufacturing productivity that translates into the economy as a whole. america's economy -- americans depend on manufacturing for good jobs and across in nation -- this nation our state depends on manufacturing. manufacturing is a vital part of most states. as our share of -- in 2001 manufacturing was one of the three largest private industry secretaryor -- sector.
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manufacturing the largest sector in 10 states. and in the midwest region as a whole. the region i live in. it's the second largest in nine states and third largest in 21 other states. mr. speaker, manufacturing is important. this is not just some kind of pipe dream. this is not just a study. this is a road map to recovering . make manufacturing real for america. make manufacturing robust for america. make manufacturing jobs for all americans. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4692, as amended.
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so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative--the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida rise? >> mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and agree to the bill,-h 5156 as amended.
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the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5156, a bill to provide for the establishment of a clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance fund to assess united states business was exporting clean energy technology products and services. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. deutsch, and the gentleman from illinois, mr. shimkus, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida. mr. deutsch: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the resolution under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. deutsch: i also ask unanimous consent for mr. rush of illinois to control the time after my opening remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. deutsch: i rise in strong support of this legislation and yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. deutsch: mr. speaker, the clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance act, h.r. 5156, will help american companies develop,
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manufacture, and export clean and renewable energy technologies around the world. most importantly, this bill will help create high quality jobs for american workers. the bill establishes a fund at the department of commerce to promote policies that reduce cost and encourage innovation and investment in the clean energy industry. the fund, which focuses on small and medium-sized businesses, will also help american companies target foreign markets for export. this will help us meet the president's goal of doubling american exports over the next five years. finally, h.r. 5156 would give businesses the opportunity to provide their own voice and input into u.s. manufacturing and trade policies. as president obama remarked last month, the transition to clean energy has the potential to grow our economy and create millions of jobs as we move out of this
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recession. despite a global decrease in clean energy investments last year, the united states continued to increase investments in this sector. for the second consecutive year, the united states added more power capacity from renewable energy, solar and wind, for example, than from conventional energy sources. but the united states still trails germany and china in renewable energy investments. this important legislation will help eliminate this gap by harnessing the creativity and innovation of american entrepreneurs and making the united states more competitive in a global market that reached over $160 billion last year. mr. speaker, this bill will help create high quality jobs for american workers. i would like to thank my friend and colleague from california, ms. matsui, for authoring this legislation, and i urge my colleagues to support this important legislation. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from illinois. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. wind and solar power is high-cost power. wind and solar costs on average three times more per kilowatt hour. that's why you have to have low energy prices if you want jocks. everything thinks it's free. it's not free. it's more expensive energy. but i'm year to thank my colleague and friend, congresswoman matsui, for her bill, h.r. 5156, that's what we are addressing today. the clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance act. this came through the commerce, trade, and consumer protection subcommittee of the energy and commerce committee on june 30. and a markup of full committee on july 21, both times passing by voice vote. it's to her credit for her great work in a bipartisan manner.
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the purpose of the bill is to create a five-year, $15 million annual assistance fund within the department of commerce, international trade administration, the purpose of the fund is to promote policies to reduce production costs, encourage innovation, investment, and create a clean energy export strategy. i also commend the chairman of the subcommittee, my good friend, bobby rush, for working with the minority to address our concern and for offering a manager's amendment at the subcommittee markup that made two important changes. the first was to amend the definition of clean energy technology so that the definition would include nuclear energy and carbon capture and sequestration. it is important to recognize that nuclear power and clean coal are essential elements to reducing our dependence on imported oil and thereby strengthening our energy security, and also keeping energy costs low. in the second was to include a provision that explicitly prohibits any of the $75 million to be allocated in the form of
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grants. however this congress and this administration truly want to revitalize the manufacturing sector, the easiest path would be to pass the existing free trade agreements that are pending -- south korea, korea, -- south korea, colombia, and pan in a. these are -- panama. these are gained in manufacturing sector and some of the agriculture sector as i'll talk about later. we always had to be concerned, jobs and the economy is the number one issue in the country, but trailing close behind is the deficit and national debt. we have been harping on the fact that we really need things paid for now. the public is not allowing us to go on continuing to multii am authorizations without saying these things have to be paid for. as we have said in numerous other gates, if it's important enough to do, it's important enough to pay for. i'll just read from the c.b.o., federal debt and the risk of
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fiscal crisis. economic and budget issue brief dated july 27, unless policymakers, that's us, unless policy makers restrain the growth of spending, which is what we are not doing today, increases revenue significantly as a share of g.d.p. or adopt some combination of those two aproaches -- approaches, growing budget deficits will cause debt to rise, to unsupportable levels. i would submit that we are already at unsportable levels and so that's why we -- unsupportable levels and so that's why we do support the bill but we always make sure spending and growth gets offset with pay fors. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: i yield six minutes to the author of the legislation, my dear friend from california, ms. matsui. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for six minutes. ms. matsui: thank you. thank you, mr. chairman, for your leadership. mr. speaker, i rise in strong
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support of my legislation, h.r. 35156, the clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance act of 2010. our nation is running a trade deficit in green technologies ranging in the billions. and the u.s. clean tech industry is lagging behind many of its competitors in exports. most notably china and germany. currently only six of the top 30 global clean energy companies are american owned. this is simply unacceptable. we must not become a nation dependent on foreign clean energy products. we must be the nation that leads the world in manufacturing and exporting clean energy technology. that is why i along with chairman rush and dingell and congresswoman eshoo introduced h.r. 5156, to boost the competitiveness of u.s. clean energy industry.
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specifically the bill would require the department of commerce in coordination with relevant agencies to implement, develop, and sustain a national clean energy technology export strategy. to provide u.s. clean tech firms with export assistance and finding and navigating foreign markets to sell their goods and services to new customers. the president has laid out a laudable goal to double u.s. exports over the next five years. and this legislation will ensure clean energy exports are at the forefront of our national export strategy. the bill will also strengthen american domestic clean tech manufacturing industry. mr. speaker, i am pleased that this legislation is a part of the make it in america manufacturing agenda to demonstrate this congress' commitment to the u.s. domestic manufacturing industry and applaud the majority leader's leadership in this.
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this legislation encourages american clean energy manufacturers, across the nation, to sell their american made clean energy technologies here in america and around the world. this is also about jobs. the department of energy has found that the emergent u.s. clean energy sector could create more than 750,000 jobs over the next decade. the clean energy emerging economy is one that we cannot afford to let pass us by. . mr. speaker, my home district of sacramento is a national leader in clean energy technologies. with more than 120 small and medium-sized clean energy companies in the region, many of these companies are beginning to manufacture clean energy products or seeking to expand their manufacturing operation and wanting to export the clean energy technologies
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to foreign markets. however, unlike big u.s. companies, small and medium-sized firms simply do not have the resources and expertise to find and advocate foreign markets and are seeking assistance. in fact, according to the trade promotion coordinating committee, more than 30% of nonexporting small and medium-sized companies would export if they had more access to market information, export opportunities and the export process. many of these companies have validated clean energy technologies and are now looking to expand their business by exporting their goods and service to new foreign markets but actually lack the resources to do so. mr. speaker, let me briefly clarify that this bill provides a modest authorization to help american small businesses with the mferings and export assistance they are seek -- manufacturing and export assistance they are seeking.
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it's not an appropriations bill. and as my colleagues on the other side are very aware, authorization measures do not appropriate funds and they do not add a dime to our deficit. the measure would have to fit within our budget past during the congressional appropriation process. the bill would not affect direct spending or revenues, therefore, pay-go procedures would not apply and it does not violate pay-go rules. mr. speaker, during the energy and commerce markup of this bill, we included several changes that my republican colleagues recommended. most notably, working in a bipartisan manner we expanded the definition of clean energy technology. we also included a transparency provision that requires the commerce department to report back to congress within 180 days of enactment, a plan to assist small and medium-sized businesses, encourage job growth and clean energy sector
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and encourage greater domestic manufacturing of clean energy products. h.r. 5156 will also enhance our standing in the race to be the global leader in clean energy. the b.p. oil spill only underscores the need for leadership in the clean energy market and this will send a strong message that america is true when it comes to exporting these technologies. i ask my colleagues to support this legislation and in turn will help families make it in america, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from illinois. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. shimkus: at this time i yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman from georgia, mr. gingrey. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from georgia is recognized. ginkgnk as i stood a few minutes -- mr. gingrey: as i stood a few minutes before in express mige -- expressing my concerns the bill that representative lipinski brought forward, the same issues exist regarding h.r. 5156, clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance act. mississippi matsui, mr. speaker, just -- ms. matsui, mr. speaker, just momentarily said we need to be exporting clean energy technology. well, with all due respect, what we need to be exporting is beef and pork and corn and soybeans and, yeah, harley-davidson would like to export a few motorcycles to colombia but they can't do it because they face such a high tariff. so my concerns, again, the bill, it's fine as far as it goes other than the fact that
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you're authorizing another $75 million -- and you can say, well, it's an authorization, it's not an appropriation. but if you give permission within committee to let those that do the appropriating, you essentially open up the floodgates for $75 million additional of taxpayer-funded programs. as president reagan said, you know, government is not the solution to our problems. it is the problem. more and more government growth , spending, deficit, debt, mr. speaker, my colleagues, the american people have spoken and i'm going to tell you, they are going to speak again. we leave here i guess sometime friday afternoon, and we will be in our district work period this year for not one month but probably six weeks, and we got to face these people.
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not just me and the 11th congressional district of georgia, but every one of us, all 435 of us have got to go home and look these folks in the eye and say, you know, i'm trying to explain to you why in our last week before the break we authorized another $75 million worth of spending, adding to the $1.4 trillion deficit this year and indeed finally adding to the national debt which is now, as we all know, over $13 trillion, something like 95% of our gross domestic product. that makes no sense, and i say this and, again, with all due respect, i know these bills came through committee voice voted in committee and full committee, but there were concerns. there were concerns about the spending. representative parker griffith, mr. speaker, our colleague from alabama, had an amendment. he said, look, this -- we need
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deficit neutrality in this bill, and that was one thing that we did vote on, that amendment, and it failed along party lines 30-15, even though the majority party keeps saying, you know, we honor pay-go except when we don't honor it. so, you know, again, i -- my colleague from california is a most respected member of the committee and this house and is a friend of mine and she's trying. just as representative lipinski was trying with his bill, but let's get the job done by lowering corporate tax rates and taking the burden, the regulatory burden off our manufacturers and go ahead and pass these free trade agreements with colombia, south korea and panama. they have been negotiated to -- negotiated fairly. we need to explain to the american people why we don't do
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that. that's how we continue to grow american jobs and not just kick the can down the road and study it and study it and study when unemployment rate of 10% and 15 million people, in fact, two million manufacturing jobs have been lost in the last couple of years. this has got to stop. with that, mr. chairman -- mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from illinois. mr. rush: mr. speaker, it's my honor and privilege to recognize now for three minutes, the dean of the house and the chairman emeritus of the energy and commerce committee, my dear friend, mr. dingell, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. dingell: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dingell: i rise in strong support of h.r. 5156, the clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance act. i commend my good friend from illinois for the outstanding
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work he did in leading the subcommittee and moving this and the other legislation forward today. and also commend my colleagues, ms. matsui and ms. eshoo as well as mr. rush for their original co-sponsorship of which i am also proud to be one. this bill will build up domestic manufacturing by promoting exports of clean energy technologies and will help the united states develop an early competitive advantage in this area. i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, especially my good republican friends, to join us in moving this legislation forward. now, we hear some objections to the bill. it's time to be reminded that this is not an appropriation but an authorization. moreover, should the funds be appropriated, h.r. 5156 will more than pay for itself through the gross in tax receipts from increased corporate revenue.
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the department of commerce estimates that every dollar invested in export promotion generates $56 worth of exports. i urge my colleagues, again, to join me in moving this forward. thus, at a corporate tax rate of 35%, additional revenues of only $40 million a year would have to be generated to cover the bill's annual $15 million authorization. this is more than double that which is based on the department of commerce's export promotion cost benefit analysis. mr. speaker, if my republican and democratic colleagues are truly concerned about promoting job growth and improving the economy, they should vote in favor of this imminently sensible bill. i've been a little distressed to hear my colleagues on the other side of the aisle making a fuss about the fact that they don't like things like cap and trade and other matters. that bill is not before us, and most of the other questions are
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not before us. i would remind my colleagues here that we are discussing increasing job opportunities at home by exporting things which are valuable, which help the world and which help the united states. i would remind my colleagues that they are better served to light a little candle rather than to sit there quietly and to curse the darkness. when this administration came in, i would remind my colleagues, that the previous administration had left us two wars, a depression and a deficit of $1.3 trillion. we are still trying to dig out of the mess which was left us by our republican colleagues, and i would urge them to cooperate with us and to focus on the important things about creating jobs and getting opportunity and check activity going forward, to continue the kind of self-defeating program that my republican friends seem
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to be sponsoring -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. rush: i yield another minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for an additional minute. mr. dingell: i would urge my colleagues on the other side to join us, let us move forward towards jobs, let us move forward towards economic activity, let us move forward towards cooperation on important matters like seeing to it that the economy gets moving and americans are going back to work. let's not sit around here whining and complaining about situations about which we have no ability at this particular minute and at this particular time to address it, but we are addressing three pieces of legislation that are going to make economic prosperity a greater reality and more real object of our attention. i urge my republican colleagues to cease this nitpicking and bickering on the floor and this nattering, which i hear coming
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from the other side, and work with us to put americans back to work and let us understand that the people have spoken in the last election and they spoke for jobs and change and we are trying to give it to them and i would ask my republican colleagues to give us that cooperation that would enable us to move more easily forward. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from illinois. mr. shimkus: yes, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. shimkus: i am always honored to follow the dean of the house, mr. dingell, who's well noted for his oratory ability and his passion and we have great respect. but i have a few things to remind him too. you know, we passed a $1.2 trillion stimulus bill that was promised to reduce unemployment to 8%. our unemployment is at 9.5%. we have 15 million unemployed americans that our issue is
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let's do things that help create jobs. and if we want to talk, you ought to go to the businesses that want to create jobs and they will tell you. a cap and trade bill that raises carbon prices and energy cost does not help create jobs. in fact, it destroys jobs. it raises gasoline prices at a minimum 50 cents. it raises electricity rates. it raises consumer rates for what they pay for home electricity or home heating. and those are -- those are just the facts. we are $13.5 trillion in debt. now, part of my life, i don't talk very much, i taught high school for four years and i taught government history. this authorization and appropriation debate is important because authorizing gives us the right to appropriate. you can't -- you shouldn't -- we do it sometimes -- you should not appropriate without an authorization. so y'all can't hide behind the
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argument. it's just an authorization. it means nothing. well, it does mean something. it does mean that you could go and get the money. if you don't authorize you shouldn't. so that's why we're having this debate. $13.5 trillion. the public is concerned about debt and spending and we can have a lot of feel-good legislation on the floor, and my colleagues are well-intentioned, but if we want to do things, if we want to fulfill the president's promise of doubling exports in five years, we ought to move on these free trade agreements, panama, colombia, south korea. . harley-davidson would like to export motorcycles to colombia you b. they face a high tariff, it's a tax. the tax is the only thing, the
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tax imposed by colombia is the only thing that makes our motorcycles not competitive in colombia. and that's not colombia, south carolina. it's a country of colombia. caterpillar would like to export more to panama. caterpillar is a great illinois company. big earth moving equipment. if there is a talk of a new panama canal being built, we would like cat billar equipment building that. what prohibits that? a high import tax. that's why we have trade negotiations. of course my pork producers, my peef producers would like to be in those markets. so this is an important bill to talk about, quote, green industry and environment i want to remind my folks that according to industry observers, lack of market expertise is not among the primary trade
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barriers. the three primary barriers are access to raw materials, labor rate comparisons, and access to foreign markets. this does nothing to address serious market barriers. it also creates a risk of stifling future generation of government. the market will direct innovation and development once the government takes winners and losers. they will -- china will cut earth rare exports by 72%. rare earth exports are the minerals needed in the green economy. they are going to control it. they are going to cut their exports. that's what we need these minerals to build this stuff. these resources are used in green technologies and wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, as well as the national security and defense system and consumer products such as new batteries on the chevy volt, mobile
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phones, p.d.a.'s and mp-3's. this cut there drop the amount of exports from just over 28,000 met rick tons to just under 8 -- metric tons to just under 8,000 metric tons for the same period last year. so we have a challenge. we ought to be negotiating. we ought to get these rare earth minerals released or we ought to allow permitting to redevelop our mining operations for our rare earth. want to shut down, it will take us forever to repert mitt it. congresswoman -- repermit it. congresswoman matsui is a well respected member of the committee. we appreciate her good work. bobby rush, the chairman, does a great job in the city of chicago. we appreciate their friendship. fortunately we have to bring up other issues, but that's part of being a loyal opposition in these austere times. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from illinois.
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mr. rush: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. rush: mr. speaker, let me return our attention to the matter at hand, to the issue that is before us. i want to first of all thank our chairman of the committee, mr. waxman, chairman waxman, and also the ranking member of the subcommittee, mr. whitfield, for their vigorous support of h.r. 5156, the clean energy and technology manufacturing and export assistance act of 2010. i was proud to co-sponsor the bill with the author, congresswoman matsui of california, and also my other co-sponsors, congresswoman eshoo and our chairman emeritus, john dingell. i want to thank this lady to my left, congresswoman matsui, for
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her stellar leadership and for taking the lead on this critical issue. i'm asking my colleagues today to vote on this bill that addresses the challenges that we face in today's economy. our friends on the other side, they want to bring up a whole lot of other issues. they want to throw a lot of things on the floor. they want to try to baffle us with a lot of their sidebar discussions, but this bill, the bill that is before us today, this bill, this bill will help to increase american manufacturing green products through the establishment of a clean energy technology manufacturing and export assistance fund to assist u.s. businesses with exporting clean technology, clean energy technology, products and
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services. we are all, mr. speaker, known that america is a prime market for foreign manufacturers. the other side doesn't want to deal with the issues we are discussing in this bill. mr. speaker, i must remind all of us that far too often the u.s. market is opened to everything else, opened to global manufacturing. but sadly the converse is not always the case. this is the case, however, for new technology products where our nation is in a unique position to once lead on a global scale. the u.s. manufacturing industry faces serious challenges overseas despite the fact that we are a leader in green technology.
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as i said repeatedly, we must seize the energy opportunity that we have today lest we slip further behind to foreign competition. we must seize the time, mr. speaker, and now isn't the time. now is the time -- there is no other time like this time. now is the time. we need a strong domestic policy to allow the manufacturing industry to be competent enough to penetrate the international market. also it's important to strengthen and transform our economy and in doing so further assert our global leadership. what continues to take place in the gulf of mexico after the
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b.p. oil spill, we should not only be a global leader in offshore technology, but we also should be a leader in clean throwing exports. -- technology exports. when i say clean, madam speaker, i also mean responsible energy technology. mr. speaker, this bill is the result because of a language i was seeking to add that helps us evaluate the impact of this program on its ability to create jobs, including the gathering of specific information as to a nature, location, and the duration of those jobs as well as the methodology used to
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compile such needed and necessary information. mr. speaker, the nattering, this is an important bill. this bill has to go forward. it has to go forward for the american people. it has to go forward for the american economy. it has to go forward so that we can once again assert our leadership across the world in the manufacturing sector, the green and clean manufacturing sector. i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill and to expand their commitment to significantly increase our exports. mr. speaker, with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5156, as amended. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules
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are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. levin: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 1875 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 1875, a bill to establish an energy commission to end the trade deficit. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from michigan, mr. levin, and the gentleman from texas, mr. brady, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: mr. speaker, first i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. levin: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. levin: mr. speaker, i urge members to support h.r. 1875, a
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bill to establish an emergency trade deficit commission. this commission will examine the causes and the consequences of the united states' persistent and substantial trade deficits. and it will provide recommendations on how to address and reduce those deficits. over the past 10 years, our trade deficits have been unprecedented. before 2000, our largest trade deficit was in 1987, when the deficit was equal to 3.3% of g.d.p. the 1987 deficit pails in pair -- pales in comparison to the deficits we have had every year from 2000 to 2008. indeed, in 2006 our trade deficit represented 6.4% of g.d.p., nearly twice as high as in 1987.
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these enormous trade deficits are corrosive. they lower our g.d.p., weaken our economic growth. it is no surprise that global imbalances and in particular huge u.s. trade deficits contributed to the global economic crisis that we are slowly recovering from. our trade deficits are improving now, but this appears to be largely due to a still weak economy recovery. not to any structural policy change. many economists are warning that massive global imbalances will return unless we take corrective action. our recrept trade deficits are due in part to a passive hands off approach to trade in the past. proponents of this flawed approach mistakenly believed that our trade deficits will resolve themselves. ignore their effect on u.s.
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manufacturers, they claim that the mercantile practices of china and some of our trade partners may be ok for the u.s. because they result in cheaper imports for our consumers. this is not a trade policy, this is a recipe for economic failure. as our president has said, and i quote, trade is going to be resip probal. -- reciprocal. it's not going to be a one-way street, end of quote. those words have been packed up with strong action such as the china safeguard action, the administration took last year. to be sure there are many causes of our trade deficits. and many causes are not directly related to trade or industrial policies. the fiscal deficits we amass over the past decade certainly played a significant role, for example, and we need to confront those issues as well.
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and trade can contribute substantially to the strength of our economy, but it has to be reciprocal. it has to be two-way trade. i believe that the work of the emergency trade deficit commission can help us determine how best to achieve two-way trade. it can help us expand and shape trade to ensure that it is working for working americans. it can help us make a thing of the past these corrosive trade deficits that weaken our economy, hurt our workers, and the manufacturers that employ them. i therefore urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this important legislation. and, madam speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is are recognized.
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>> at this point, i'd like to yield four minutes to the gentleman from kentucky, congressman davis. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky is are recognized for four minutes. mr. davis: i'm pleased we're having this debate about the importance of trade for america's manufacturing sector. given my experience in manufacturing, i'm pleased to provide my firsthand familiarity with what makes businesses successful and creates jobs. my own experience tells me international trade is vital. in my home state of kentucky, nearly 50,000 manufacturing jobs are are dependent on manufacturing exports. 90% of the world's consumers live outside the united states and the fastest growing markets are outside our borders. success is critical to growing our manufacturing sector. america's exports and manufactured goods support one out of every five manufacturing jobs and those jobs pay 15% more than average. we simply must increase exports
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and that's the key to any debate about the trade deficit. if we're going to be successful in growing exports, we need to identify the best practices for doing system of we have real world results we can use to identify these practices. these facts show clearly there is no more effective way than negotiating new trade agreements to open markets, foreign markets, to u.s. exports this benefits of cafta to the united states' manufacturing sectors are clear. because of this agreement we swung a trade deficit in manufactured goods of $1.1 billion to a trade surplus of $1.9 billion and we already have a surplus of $1.3 billion so far this year. madam speaker, in the manufacturing world, we never base our best practices on one successful outcome. fortunately, the success of the central america free trade agreement.
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in 2009 the u.s. had an overall trade surplus of over $27 billion with these eight couldn't areries system of far in 2010, we have a surplus of over $14 billion. the results for the american manufacturing sector are even stronger. in 2009, the united states had a trade surplus of over $29 billion with these couldn't areries and in 2010, $16 billion this is a track record that firmly establishes the trade agreement as the best practices for lowering the trade deficits. given the ambitious track record of success, i don't think we need another government commission. however, i understand that for some, the facts i have cited aren't enough and therefore i do rise in support of this bill. i want to help those with doubts about the benefits of trade agreements see how vital they are to the success of american manufacturing so i'll support this legislation in an effort to educate others on these benefits. the benefits of well-ect cuted, bilateral free trade agreements properly structured between the
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partners. i expect the commission will reach the same conclusion i and many others have reached. however, i'm --ed -- concerned we can't simply wait for the commission to do its analysis. other couldn't areries are racing ahead of us in making agreements that benefit their workers while we sit on the sideline. that's why -- my colleagues and i on this side of the aisle stand ready to work with the president to prepare not only the south korea agreement but to prepare the agreement with colombia and panama as well. i'm confident the agreements will be just as successful for american workers in the u.s. manufacturing sector as our prior agreements and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: i now yield two minutes to our distinguished colleague a member of the ways and means committee, mr. pascrell from new jersey. the speaker pro tempore: think
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gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. pascrell: thank you, madam speaker, thank you, mr. chairman. i want to agree with the gentleman from kentucky. but there's a catch here. in the last six months, we have gained 136,000 manufacturing jobs, private jobs. it's one of the few pluses that we can refer to. so there is hope for the future in terms of manufacturing. if we do the right thing. i rise in support of h.r. 1875, the end trade deficit act and i thank my friend from oregon for introducing this important legislation. through the year, mr. defazio continues to speak out over the din and over the years for the american consumer and for fair trade policies. i salud you.
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the united states has run a persistent trade deficit with the world since 1978, including structural deficits with several major trading partners year after year this includes a $220 billion trade deficit with china alone in 2000, on, nine years ago, china was granted admission to the world trade organization that number was $84 billion. it's increased in nine years by $136 billion. one study by the economic policy institute estimates that the dramatic increase in our trade deficit with china alone has cost this country $2.4 million -- has cost this country 2.4 million jobs. the american people, the middle class, know that our trade policy has not worked for them. they see in their everyday lives, in my hometown of
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paterson, new jersey, we closed factories we reopened them south of the border or overseas. why haven't we stopped the rem raj -- hemorrhaging of jobs to places offshore. another min? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is yielded an additional two minutes. mr. pascrell: we continue down this path. our trade deficit is unsustainable. we must begin to tackle it if we want to create jobs here in the united states and remain a prosperous country in the future. there's no silver bullet out there that will balance the books, which is why a comprehensive study of the problem and recommendations for policy solutions which is prescribed in this legislation specifically is very necessary. the commission will look at many of the tactics we know are trade -- we know our trading partners use in order to place
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their exports at an advantage and in order that they have played and gamed the system to our disadvantage. foreign currency manipulation. we've addressed it in some esoteric statements now and then. we know what china is doing and it hurts us in terms of what the americas are trying to do tariff and nontariff barriers just mentioned before in the previous legislation by the gentleman from illinois. foreign subsidization of manufacturing, other countries have different taxing methodologies than we do. they subsidize their industries. how can our industries compete against that unless we address that particular issue which we're afraid to do, both sides of the aisle are afraid to address the real issues on trade. and the weak environmental and labor standards. i'm pleased the commission will include the impact of border
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tax adjustments which penalize our exporters by an average of 15.2% and are currently totally legal under current global trade agreements. we will not deal with the imbalance in our trade agreements unless we understand how countries have gamed the system to hurt our workers. that's why we continue to offshore these jobs. at the end of the day -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. levin: i yield the gentleman an additional 30 seconds. mr. pascrell: i thank the gentleman. at the end of the day, the united states is the most open, accessible, and dynamic market in the world. we hold our trading partners hopefully to the same standard. we must tackle our trade deficit head on so that united states businesses and families can continue to prosper in the years to come. i urge passage of this legislation. i eagerly await the report of
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the commission. i yield the rest of my time back which is nothing but thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. >> i would like to yield three minutes to the gentleman from louisiana who is the top republican on the oversight committee whose focus son the moratorium in the gulf, dr. boustany. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana is recognized for three minutes. mr. boustany: thank you, and i thank mr. brady from texas for yielding time to me. i think it's important to recognize and i agree with the gentleman who just spoke, mr. pascrell, that the united states has the most vibrant, open market in the world and we need to take advantage of our leadership position. the u.s. has led globally since 1945 in setting the standards
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for open trade. trade agreements give access to american workers and businesses to other markets for u.s. services and products. let's face it, 95% of the consumers of the world are outside of the borders of the united states. so our trade agreements create u.s. jobs. despite having the trade deficit we talked about, the u.s. trade balance with 13 countries that have -- that we have free trade agreements implemented with has improved our export capacity by 476% between 2001 and 2009, creating a trade surplus with those respective countries of over $25 billion. case by case, we can look at these. chile, morocco, singapore, australia. these exceeded actual export growth estimates initially put forth by the international trade commission. the u.s. had a trade surplus with each of these countries,
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enhancing the competitiveness of u.s. workers and businesses. the failure to implement an aggressive trade strategy that focuses on exports put he -- puts the u.s. at extreme risk of falling behind competitively. we know china is embarking on an aggressive trade policy globally. we have a multipolar world today with various aggressive trade policies working against us and our country has been on the sidelines for the last year and a half in trade this failure threatens u.s. credibility globally. frankly, it threatens u.s. credibility. it's also a threat to the historic u.s. leadership role that we have set in setting global standards for open trade. now, i believe that this new commission really is unnecessary. i'm going to support it if it's the only way to jump start something on trade but i really do think it's unnecessary.
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if you go back and look at the higs toric role that the ways and means committee has played in implementing an open trade policy, a trade policy that benefits u.s. workers, it goes back to the 1920's and possibly before that. i remember reading about kordell hull, a member of the house ways and means committee, a democrat, espoused open trade, became secretary of state and continued to espouse open trade. our ways and means committee has an ill lust res you history of doing this. i believe that's where the leadership shoiled come from, i believe we can work together in trying to implement and working with this administration to come up with a good, solid trade strategy that promotes u.s. competitiveness. that's where i believe the authority should lie. i think it's clear what we need to do. we need to implement the three pending free trade agreements, south korea, panama and clomyasm these will immediately
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help enhance exports and create u.s. jobs. they have access to our market, we need access to those markets. in a hearing just yesterday, stu isenstein who served in the clineton administration, described these as no-cost trade mechanisms. i believe in implementing an agreement -- a strong u.s. trade strad strategy that foe uses on exports where we can enhance our export exasstwism need to look at the other things holding us back on u.s. competitiveness. we need to lower the corporate rate. if we lower this corporate tax rate this one has u.s. competitive -- this will enhance u.s. competitiveness. we need to back away from u.s. taxes that are hurting u.s. competitiveness. mr. brady: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman has an additional minute. mr. boustany: if we lower our corporate tax rate that will enhance u.s. competitiveness. we do have a different tax system than other countries utilize that i think hurt ours competitiveness, but if we take steps such as what the administration has proposed in its current budget in the international tax treatment of u.s. companies, we'll hurt u.s. job growth, we'll urt exports and we'll hurt u.s. competitiveness. i think it's imperative we take a look at this and our committee, the ways and means committee should take the lead in this as well. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas reserves his time. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. . mr. leffy: it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the active distinguished gentleman from oregon, mr. defazio. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized for three minutes. mr. defazio: i thank the chairman. it's interesting to hear some republicans on the other side of
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the aisle say this commission isn't necessary. we are going to run a $700 billion trade deficit this year. that means we will borrow predominantly from china, japan, and a few other countries $700 billion to buy things that we used to make in america. and it's not a level playing field. we get played for a sucker in these trade deals. we need a new strong trade policy. yes, american workers can compete, but not on an unfair tilted playing field which is what they are being asked to do today. i'll give a couple examples. when we are doing m.f.n. permanently for china which i voted against because we lost that annual leverage from them. we guys from oregon came in, congressman, a ship is going into china. imagine what it's going to mean for our markets. they are finally accepting our wheat. this trade deal will be great.
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i said actually they are not going to allow that and they are not going to become dependent on imported food. no, you're wrong. their one ship got in. congress voted a deal. china was permanently off the hook to be revealed by unfair trade practices, and guess what? that was the last ship. they came in the next year, kind of hanging their heads, and said, you're right. are you going to say it? i said no, what are we going to do now? and talked about fighting back against these unfair trade practices. we can look at just after the first president bush signed a deal with canada that was supposed to do with their un-- deal with their unfair subsidies and dumping of cheap lumber into the u.s. before the ink was dry on the deal, canada reclassified their -- much of their lumber to salvage. they basically started giving away their trees on the stump. instead of making companies buy
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them. and provided subsidized transportation and other things. again flooded the u.s. market. we are still fighting with the canadians 17 years later over their subsidized lumber and we still lost thousands of jobs. yeah, there was a little bit of cheaper lumber available here. but when you lose the jobs for working class americans, middle class american families, our consumers, when they lose their jobs, it doesn't matter if a house is maybe $00 or $400 cheaper, they can't afford the house. we need a level playing field. we need to identify these barriers that are being put up by the chinese and others. the chinese are going to run more than a quarter of a trillion doll -- dollar trade surplus with the u.s. this year. they recently passed a law saying they are going to have a huge renewable program in china. and the law says that nobody can buy a renewable windmill or photovoltaic or anything else if
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it wasn't manufactured in china by a chinese company. clear -- would the gentleman yield an additional two minutes? mr. levin: be glad to yield an additional two minutes to the sponsor of the bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon has an addition at two minutes. mr. defazio: i thank the gentleman. the chinese have passed a law saying no one in china can buy a u.s. made windmill or photovoltaic. we get these green jobs and green industry going the president wants, the chinese around going to buy them. the so-called stimulus bill that passed this congress, part of those funds, our taxpayer dollars money we borrowed in part from china to finance that bill, but were used to buy windmills made in china. they can get their windmills in here like that. there is a company proposing to assemble photovoltaics in my hometown in oregon but i also have people trying to keep their companies going with made in america photovoltaic. they are having trouble competing with the subsidized
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cheap junk from china because their photovoltaics are not very good. again, we can't send ours there but they can send theirs here without any constraints. i remember back to lee iacocca back when we laughed at the japanese cars. he said, when he had mini vance and the japanese started producing mini vance. i produce a mini van for $16,000. i send it to japan, it sits on the dock for six months while a series of inspectors come down and look at it. finally when it gets to the show room, it costs $30,000. it's been there six months. the japanese take their mini van, it costs $17,000 to make. they put it on a ship. it gets to portland, they roll it off. it's in the show room the next day. do we ever reciprocate? if you are going to keep our cars on your docks for six months, how about we are going to keep your cars on our docks for six months? and that's what the trade mission will point to. it will point to the unfair trade barriers these whole
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series of different sanitary or safety inspectors or currentlycy -- currency manipulation that countries are doing to steal our jobs and kill off our industries, this commission can point to those things. they can emphasize them and propose ways we can deal with it more meaningfully in trade agreements in the future. i recommend to my colleagues help end the trade deficit. vote for this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. >> i yield two minutes to the former top republican on the trade subcommittee, the gentleman from california who is focused on creating jobs and selling more to california and the urns products and services, mr. herger. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. herger: thank you. madam speaker, i find it ironic that we are here today creating one more commission to study a problem and report back with possible solutions some time in
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the future when we could be taking action right now today that will reduce our trade deficit and make a real difference for american workers. one of the findings in this bill states the problem very clearly, quote, while the united states has one of the most open economies in the world, the united states faces significant tariff and nontariff trade barriers with its trading partners, close quote. for example, over 90% of panamanian and colombian exports enter the u.s. duty free. additionally, the average korean tariff for u.s. exporters is more than four times the average tariff that korean products face in the united states market. we could slash these high tariffs on u.s. exports and level the playing field for american workers by passing the
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current pending free trade agreement with these three nations. madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to continue the bipartisan tradition since world war ii of supporting trade and call for passage of the pending f.t.a. for colombia, pan in a, and south korea. -- panama, and south korea f we really want to create jobs. pass these trade agreements. if we want to increase trade exports, pass these trade agreements. if we want to reduce trade deficits, pass these trade agreements. we don't need another commission. we need action. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas. mr. brady: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: first addressing some earlier comments, many democrats, including chairman levin, supported bringing china into the world trade organization to force them to play by the rules. and since we did that, when they violate those rules, the united states has prevailed in seven of the eight complaints we have brought to that organization. so it is helping keeping china in line so we have a level playing field. also if you picked up the paper in the last week, you have noticed that while auto sales in the united states for our auto manufacturers has remained flat, its sales are growing overseas and its profits are growing because they are allowed to sell american automobiles around the world. that's good for the u.s. auto workers in the united states. i think -- i appreciate the chairman bringing this legislation together. i know it is well intended. it's important to tackle america's trade deficit the right way. and i think everyone understands another government commission alone is no substitute for new
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customers for american workers, farmers, and manufacturers. the best way to strengthen the trade deficit while strengthening america's economy is reduce america's dependence on foreign oil and open the world to more u.s. products and services. i know if my democrat friends and those in the white house are serious about reducing the trade deficit, we are eager to work with them by starting to take up and passing the pending trade agreements with south korea, panama, and colombia. i rise in support of this bill because i think that any objective and honest commission will find creating new markets, new customers for american exports will reduce our trade deficit, will create jobs and stimulate our economy. i think it's absolutely appropriate congress is considering this legislation today of all days. today is the fifth anniversary of house passage of the u.s. central free trade agreement which gives us an opportunity to look at real results. those results clearly show how trade agreements increase u.s.
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sales and reduce trade deficits. as you know america is a very open market. countries sell into the united states. but when we try to sell our products, too often we find out america need not apply sign. trade agreements tear that sign down and give us a chance not one way trade in but twoway trade where we have a level playing field. the world has changed. it's not enough to simply buy american, we have to sell american. we have to sell our products and goods and services throughout this world. in fact, over 80% of our trade deficits today is with countries that are not trade agreement partners. that are not level playing fields for the united states. that's why we push hard for those agreements. five years ago the united states, for example, five years ago, the united states had a $1.2 billion trade deficit with central america. last year the united states had turned that around because the agreement to a $1.2 bill trade
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surplus. we are on track to surpass that surplus again this year. last year the united states had a trade surplus in manufactured goods with our central american partners of almost $2 billion. we are on track again this year. nor is cafta the only example how trade agreements can improve u.s. trade balance. this week also marks the eighth anniversary of the final house vote on the trade act of 2002, under which we have resoundingly successful trade agreements with 13 countries now in force. last year the united states had a trade surplus of over $25 billion with these 13 countries and so far this year we have a surplus again. looking at just trade and manufactured goods reveals these agreements were even better for american manufacturing workers. last year the united states had a trade surplus of over $29 billion in manufactured products with these countries that we
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have free trade agreements. again this year a surplus already of nearly $16 billion. without question these trade agreements have reduced u.s. trade deficits and increased u.s. trade surpluses. the three pending agreements with colombia, panama, and south korea would have the same results by leveling the playing field for our american workers. manufactures, there is one sector in which the united states runs the structural trade deficit, that is energy. and i appreciate the chairman including this in the commission. last year our deficit and energy products accounted for almost half of the trade deficit. our trade deficit isn't principally in goods, it's in oil. it's in energy. that's what the american people want changed. we can take an enormous step toward reducing our trade deficit simply by increasing american made energy. unfortunately, many democrats in congress have taken just about every step they can to reduce
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american made energy production. first, house democrats rushed through the house a massive national energy tax that would cripple u.s. energy sector. now the white house has defied the courts as imposed a moratorium on offshore drilling that damages job and u.s. energy production. the impact of that moratorium would be to increase the deficit because it will result in more imports of foreign oil. this moratorium also means fewer manufacturing jobs. in fact, last week recent analysis by ihs global insight found, it would result in over 300,000 jobs lost along the gulf and over $147 billion in lost state, local, and federal tax revenue. it is a terrible blow to american jobs. if the sponsors of this legislation are serious, and i believe they are, about reducing the trade deficit and working together to create manufacturing
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jobs, let's focus on negotiating more trade agreements to open foreign markets to our u.s. sales and promoting u.s. energy production. we don't need a new government commission to accomplish either of these. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: now the distinguished ranking member on the trade subcommittee has yielded back the balance of his time, i'll close. first of all, i want to thank mr. defazio for introducing the bill and for his willingness and his really effective efforts to work with us. his staff also collaborated bringing this bill to the floor and i also want to thank congressman camp and congressman brady and their staff for working with us. .
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we'll debate trade issues another time. i think everybody here has spoken about the importance of two-way trade and ending the one-way street and the problem with the agreement is -- the korea agreement is, when it comes to the industrial sector, there was no way there was even close to a likelihood that there would be two-way trade in vital industrial sectors. so far it's only within bun -- only been one way and now steps have to be take within the other provisions in the bill to make sure there's two-way trade in industrial as well as agricultural goods, as well as opening up their markets to service. -- to service products. all right, i think we are finished with this we can
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discuss the moratorium on drilling some other day. i now urge passage of this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will he house -- will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. -- as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table and wok the title amended.
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for what purpose does the gentlewoman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and agree to house resolution 1481, national save for retirement week. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 1481, resolution supporting the goals and ideals of national save for retirement week, including raising public awareness of the various tax preferred retirement vehicles and increasing personal financial literacy. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from pennsylvania, ms. schwartz, and the gentleman from texas, mr. johnson, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from pennsylvania. ms. schwartz: madam speaker, ski unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. the gentlewoman from pennsylvania.
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ms. schwartz: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from pennsylvania. ms. schwartz: i rise in support of the national save for retirement week resolution that i have sponsored with my friend and colleague representative sam johnson. we have championed this proposal in each of the last three years. saving for one's retirement is of paramount importance. less than 2/3 of workers are saving for retirement and those who are saving aren't saving enough to adequately fund their retirement. as a result, too many americans relie only on social security for retime. social security is the bedrock of retirement however on average, social security retirees receive $14,000 a year, hardly adequate as the sole source of retirement income for most americans. this resolution would help raise public awareness of the importance of saving for
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retirement and encourage greater personal financial responsibility. congress and employers can help encourage saving for retirement through information on long-term savings vehicles and through payroll deduction options that exist for most americans. the savings rate has risen to 3% up from two years ago when americans were barely saving at all. we can build awareness to save for emergencies, and for retirement. small savings throughout one's working lifetime will result in a more secure retirement. as we acknowledge the 75th anniversary of social security and renew our commitment to social security's guaranteed minimum benefits for future seniors, we should also acknowledge and support this resolution and encourage more americans to save for their retirement. i yield back.
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i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. johnson: madam speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. johnson: i want to thank my colleague from pennsylvania for working with me on this resolution. this resolution calls attention to the importance of saving for retirement by designating october 17 through october 23, 2010, as national save for retirement week. with fewer and fewer employees offering traditional pension plans and with social security intended to provide only basic income support, saving for retirement is more important than ever before. the good news, however, is that the tax code offers any number of savings incentives not only intended to encourage americans to save but make it easier for them to do so. for young workers, just putting away a little bit from each
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paycheck through tax-preferred retirement savings accounts, such as a 401k, or an i.r.a., can add up to a sizable nest egg while young workers may not start off be wig paychecks, they at least have the benefit of time and compound interest on their side. meanwhile, for older workers nearing retirement, the tax code can help by enabling these workers to make catch-up contributions. with this resolution, it is my hope we can make more americans aware that not just of the importance of saving for retirement but of the available tax incentives to do so. by taking advantage of these incentives and regularly putting away a little bit, americans can better secure their retirement. for young workers, just putting away a little bit from each paycheck through tax preferred retirement savings accounts can
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add up to a sizable nest egg, while young workers may not start off with big paychecks they at least have the benefit of time and compound interest on their side. fewer and fewer employees offering traditional pension plans and with social security only providing the basics, i think we need to make it easier for them to do so and that's why ms. schwartz and i have offered this resolution. madam speaker, i yield -- i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from pennsylvania is recognized. ms. schwartz: i have no more speakers, i reserve the balance of my time in case there are other speakers on the other side of the aisle. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. johnson: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from pennsylvania
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is recognized. ms. schwartz: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass house resolution 1481. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the resolution is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? >> i move that the house suspend the rules and agree to h.r. 1796, residential carbon monoxide poisoning prevention act, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 330, h.r. 1796, a bill
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to amend the consumer products safety act to require residential carbon monoxide detectors to meet the apublic cabble ansi/ul standard by treating that as a consumer product safety rule, to require installation of such detectors in homes andfish other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, and the gentleman from georgia, mr. gingrey, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. sarbanes: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. the gentleman from maryland. mr. sarbanes: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. sarbanes p.c. -- mr. sarbanes: i rise today in support of the carbon monoxide poisoning prevention act.
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carbon monoxide poisoning kills more than 400 people each year and sends more than 20,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment. carbon monoxide can build up in your home when a furnace or other fuel burning appliance isn't functioning properly. what make this is gas particularly dangerous is that you can't see it or smell it. at least with a fire, you can see the flames, smell the smoke, or feel the heat. with carbon monoxide, in many cases, all you start to feel is flu-like symptoms. you have no idea you're facing something even more dangerous. but there is a simple and effective way to come pat carbon monoxide poisoning. installing a carbon monoooks side alarm in your home. h.r. 1796 takes two important steps to promote the use of
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carbon monoxide alarms in homes and other places. first this legislation makes the voluntary industry standards for carbon monoxide alarms mandatory consumer product safety standards. this means these life-saving devices will be required to meet these performance standards, rather than allowing compliance to be voluntary. if we're going to encourage the use of a safety device, then we must be sure it meets and will continue to meet industry performance standards. putting in place mandatory standards means that if a carbon monoxide alarm doesn't meet the relevant performance standards, then it cannot be sold in the united states and will be subject to action by the consumer product safety commission. . secondly it authorizes a grant program to encourage states to adopt laws to expand the use of cash job monoxide alarms in all humes with -- carbon monoxide alarms in all homes.
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the authorization for this program is very modest, just $2 million in each of fiscal years 2011 through 2015. the funds will help state and local governments with strong carbon monoxide alarm laws to carry out training for enforcement of those laws, educate the public about the dangers of carbon monoxide, and most importantly to purchase alarms for low-income and elderly households and other places serving vulnerable populations. i want to thank my colleagues in the minority for working with us on this legislation. i want to a lewd my colleague, representative mathison. i'd -- matheson. i had'd like to thank others for helping to improve this legislation and support of this measure. i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. gingrey: madam speaker, thank you.
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i rise not really in opposition to h.r. is 96, the -- 1796, the residential carbon monoxide poison prevention act. parts of this legislation i'm very much in favor of. particularly regarding the encouragement in the grant program to try to help people to know what the gentleman from maryland just said in regard to the danger of carbon monoxide, which is colorless, and odorless. and it causes far too many poisons. and indeed death, i think 170 americans each year. one would be too many, madam speaker. i question somewhat the necessity of making the standards for the detectors going from a voluntary standard to a mandatory standard. but in regard to encouraging
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widespread use of the detectors, not only in places of business but absolutely in a home setting where a lot of times you got these generators because of a power outage or camping equipment that is misused or malfunctions and you -- it leads to these tragedies that we are trying to avoid. absolutely commend my colleague, my colleagues and in particular my friend from utah, jim matheson, in bringing this bill forward. i was very supportive in the committee markup. and, madam speaker, i would like to take the opportunity to relate the same story that i did in committee, true story, unfortunately, when i was growing up my parents owned what you might refer to as a mom and
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pop motel. like a motel 6 except i think we had 25 units and we charged $8 a night for one person and $10 a night for two. but that was the family business. and we at that particular -- for a number of years, madam speaker, we didn't have a home. my parents had an efficiency apartment in the office of the motel, and most of the time we would have vacancies so me and my two brothers would spend the night in one of the motel rooms. it would vary from night to night. and i was about, i guess 13 years old, one weekend in unit number 1 was a unit with two double beds. it was a larger unit of our 25 unit motel. so we would always like to stay in unit number 1. on the weekend, a cold winter night, my brother was 14, i was 13, and his best friend was 14.
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we stayed in unit number 1. well, the very next weekend, unit number 1 was rented so we weren't able to stay there. and i remember going to mass on sunday morning, my dad was methodist. my mom was a catholic. and mom took me and my two brothers to mass. when we the chair: back -- when we came back unfortunately in the parking lot of that motel i saw what i had never seen before, a beige, brown hearst looking, two or three of them in the parking lot of this motel. well, madam speaker, what had happened is three soldiers that weekend stayed in unit number 1. and they were 18, 19 years old. they had crossed the state line because you could drink beer in south carolina when you were 18 years old and you couldn't do it in georgia. so we would get a lot of weekend business from the military.
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and these young soldiers got affixiated that night with carbon monoxide poisoning. it was just such a devastating thing to my dad, just about causing to loose his mind, quite honestly, and his business, even though it wasn't his fault. it was a faulty heater that the way the wind was blowing that night it blew the burnt fuel back into the room. these three soldiers, young boys, god bless them, lost their lives that night. so when representative matheson brought this bill before energy and commerce committee, as you know, madam speaker, as also a committee member, man, it's brought all that back. it was 50 years ago, more than -- 55 years ago that that happened. it was just like it was yesterday. i commend the gentleman. i absolutely do. i have some concerns about
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changing from a mandatory standard to -- a voluntary standard to mandatory. this is good work. it's good legislation. and for that reason i am going to support it. and i'll reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. sarbanes: thank you, madam speaker. our colleague from georgia's story really puts a punctuation mark on why this legislation is so critical. i'd like now pleased to yield as much time as he will consume to the sponsor of the legislation, representative matheson from utah. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. matheson: thank you, madam speaker. i'm pleased to rise to talk about this bill today. legislation, quite frankly, addresses an issue that's been growing in awareness that still requires attention in order to significantly reduce the number of easily preventable injuries and deaths caused by carbon monoxide poisoning in the united states.
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annually over 500 people die from carbon monoxide poisoning and an additional 15,000 are hospitalized for carbon monoxide sickness. unfortunately many of these individuals are already at risk. the elderly and their children. in many states and cities, local governments have addressed this issue. they are at the forefront to pass legislation to reduce carbon monoxide poisonings at homes. i hope this will expand those efforts. the risks are real yet the danger is poorly understood. it is often misdiagnosed as stomach flu. individuals can unknowingly spend hours inside homes which have dangerously high levels of carbon monoxide. nearly all these incidents could have been easily prehaven'ted with functioning carbon monoxide alarms. so this legislation aims to cut down on those numbers while increasing awareness of the issue. number one, accepted scientific standards for carbon monoxide alarms into law.
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two, it examines weather carbon monoxide warnings should be expanded. and establishes a grant program to state and local governments to provide alarms and raise awareness. madam speaker, i would also like to point out that this is a bill that's gone through a legislative process. we held hearings from the original bill that was introduced, the text has changed. that that's what we are here to do as legislators. we try to work through things. bring in witnesses to learn more about this issue. we perfected this bill. and made it better. and i really want to acknowledge the efforts of everyone on the energy and commerce committee in a bipartisan way trying to address this issue as best we could. that's what we are supposed to do here in congress. a lot of bickering going on in washington these days, here's an example where folks actually sat down and rolled up their sleeves and tried to address an issue in a constructive way. i want to acknowledge that effort on both sides of the aisle. i encourage all my colleagues to support this bill. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance
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of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. gingrey: madam speaker, i do not have any other members who have requested time to speak on this bill. i tell the gentleman from maryland who is controlling the time that i'm prepared to yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland prepared to close? mr. sarbanes: i am, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia yield back his time. mr. gingrey: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. sarbanes: thank you, madam speaker. again we can't emphasize enough the importance of this legislation. you have heard recounted here. the tragic stories of what happened when you don't have these kinds of mechanisms in place. and you don't have the education to support people in terms of bringing this into their homes. and so i want to again congratulate representative matheson for his efforts.
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thank my colleagues for the bipartisan support of this measure. and urge its passionage today. with that i -- passage today. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1796. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from nming new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: madam speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and agree to h.res. 1499, honoring the achievements of dr. robert m. campbell jr. to provide children with lifesaving medical care, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 1499, resolution honoring the achievements of dr. robert m. campbell jr. to provide children with lifesaving medical care. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from georgia, mr. gingrey, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i
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ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: madam speaker, i yield to myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, madam speaker. house resolution 1499 honors the achievements of dr. robert m. campbell jr. to provide children with lifesaving medical care. i want to thank the sponsor of the bill, congresswoman debi wasserman schultz from florida for sponsor -- debbie wasserman schultz from florida, for sponsoring this bill and tireless efforts to get co-sponsors and what's necessary to bring this bill to the floor on a expedited basis today. i will leave it to the congresswoman to talk more about dr. robert m. campbell. let me just say that he is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, affiliated for many years with the university of texas. and also now director of the
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thoracic insufficiency center at the children's hospital of philadelphia. in collaboration with other specialists he helped identify thoracic insufficiency syndrome, which is associated with a rare condition of congenital scleosis, fused ribs, small chest, and missing ribs. after 14 years, the food and drug administration approved the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib in 2004 through dr. campbell's efforts. i want to applaud his work. urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this resolution and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. gingrey: madam speaker, i rise today in support of this resolution, house resolution 1499, honoring the achievements of dr. robert campbell jr. and the work that he has -- that he did in regard to not only this